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US Power Labs Study

Subjects were instructed to work out to Fit in Seconds 90 second videos within 15 minutes of all meals for a 30 day period. Subjects were weighed on Day 1 and Day 30. Subjects lost an average of 7 lbs over the 30 day period.

According to a new study in the journal Diabetologia, breaking up exercise sessions into "snack"-size sessions—just for one minute at an intense enough level to push your heart to 90 percent of its maximum beating rate, about 30 minutes before eating a meal— helps keep blood sugars even and balanced.

 

The study focused on participants who were in the beginning stages of showing signs of insulin resistance. Each volunteer exercises in different ways before eating breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Their blood sugar levels were measured on exercise days, and on post-exercise days. The researchers found that those people who "exercise snacked" before eating registered lower blood sugar levels—for a full 24 hours—than those who worked out for 30 minutes but had lower heart rates while doing so.

The study's authors suggest that these short (yet intense!) "exercise snacks" before meals might mean something in terms of helping give our bodies' fat- and sugar-burning mechanisms a mega-boost.

Exercise guru to the stars looks to the past for new workout - Los Angeles Pop Culture | Examiner.com

http://www.examiner.com/article/exercise-guru-to-the-stars-looks-to-the-past-for-new-workout

Pop Culture Passionistas: Exercise Guru to the Stars Looks to the Past for New Workout

http://www.popculturepassionistas.com/2014/11/exercise-guru-to-stars-looks-to-past.html

Have a Minute? Then You Have Time for a Workout

By Carl Engelking | November 6, 2014 3:04 pm

In May, the New York Times published a story about the scientifically proven 7-minute workout routine to stay fit. But who has seven minutes? Now, scientists have discovered that just one minute of all-out, high-intensity exercise three times a week can markedly improve muscle and heart health in overweight individuals.

180 Seconds Per Week

Researchers from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada recruited 14 men and women who were overweight, but in good health, to test the expedited fitness regimen. All the participants regularly exercised two or fewer times per week, and were far from reaching the recommended 150 minutes of weekly moderate exercise.

Researchers recorded participants’ baseline health information and took blood and muscle samples. Then, they put participants on a 6-week training regimen. During the training period, researchers individually customized each person’s diet using a mathematical formula to calculate their required calories — roughly 2,600 calories for men and 1,800 calories for women.

Seeing Results

It turns out that just 1 minute of intense exercise three times a week for 6 weeks was potent enough to induce physiological changes in the bodies of 14 overweight people, based on measurements following their workouts.

Blood pressure and blood glucose readings for both men and women improved. Their bodies’ maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) — one of the best measures of cardiovascular fitness — also increased by 12 percent. Researchers published their findings Monday in the online journal PLOS One.

Researchers write that their study “provides further evidence of the potential for very brief, intense bursts of exercise to elicit physiological adaptations that are associated with improved health status in a time-efficient manner.” In other words: busy people, your cover is blown.


Two minutes of exercise will beat diabetes: Twice-weekly workouts is all it takes

A BURST of exercise for just two minutes a week can prevent diabetes.

By: Jo Willey

Published: Tue, May 20, 2014

 

 

 

Dr Babraj

“This is the beauty of high- intensity training: it is quick to do and it is effective.”

He said that few people manage to achieve the Government’s recommended 150 minutes exercise of each week – and the most common reason given was lack of time.

 

 

 

Sprinting two minutes twice a week can help prevent diabetes[GETTY]

The high-intensity workouts are as effective as current guidelines for five 30-minute sessions each week, say scientists.

And there is even more good news for people who are worried about their fitness levels.

“You don’t have to be able to go at the speed of Usain Bolt when you’re sprinting,” said Dr John Babraj, head of the research team.

“As long as you are putting your maximum effort into the sprints, it will improve your health.”

His team at Abertay University in Dundee studied how the high-­intensity training twice a week affected a group of overweight middle-aged people who are known to be at risk of developing diabetes.

  

Exercise Produces Instant Change to DNA

Article | May 22, 2014 - 9:21am | By Lara Adejoro


Scientists have discovered that when healthy but inactive individuals exercise for a just a few minutes, it produces an instant change to their DNA. 

The fundamental genetic code in human muscle isn’t altered with exercise, but the DNA molecules within those muscles are chemically and structurally altered in significant ways. These modifications to the DNA at specific locations are considered early events in the genetic reprogramming of muscle strength and, consequently, in the metabolic and structural benefits of exercise.
Muscle adapts to what a person does. If you don’t use it, you lose it, and this is one of the mechanisms which enable that to take place.
The DNA changes involved are called epigenetic modifications and entail the gain or loss of chemical marks on DNA other than the familiar sequence of As, Gs, Ts, and Cs. The research demonstrates that the DNA in skeletal muscle extracted from individuals following a burst of exercise has fewer chemical marks than it did prior to exercise. Those changes happen in stretches of DNA which are involved in turning “on” genes necessary for muscles’ adaptation to exercise.
When the scientists made muscles contract in laboratory dishes, they observed much the same loss of DNA methyl groups.
Our genomes are a lot more dynamic than they are usually given credit for. Epigenetic modifications which turn genes on and back off again can be incredibly flexible events. They enable the DNA in our cells to adjust as the environment shifts.

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New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) indicates that brief bursts of intense exercise before meals (termed exercise 'snacking' by the study authors) helps control blood sugar in people with insulin resistance more effectively than one daily 30-minute session of moderate exercise. The research was conducted by exercise science and medicine researchers, including Monique Francois and Associate Professor James Cotter from the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.


Female participants completed the trials in the early follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (across three separate cycles), whereas male participants had a minimum of 7 days between trials.

The researchers found that the exercise snacking routines controlled blood sugar more effectively than CONT routine, particularly 3-h post-meal glucose following breakfast (17% reduction compared to no exercise) and dinner (13% reduction compared to CONT). Across the day this represented a 12% reduction in mean post-meal blood glucose concentration. The effect of the pre-lunch ES on blood glucose levels after lunch was unclear. Moreover, the reductions in blood glucose with ES compared to CONT persisted for a further 24 hours across the day following exercise.

While acknowledging that further work is required to determine the clinical significance of their study, the authors say their work adds to the recent interest in 'accumulating physical activity' as brief, repetitive bouts of intense exercise (as opposed to a single, prolonged, continuous exercise session) to prevent cardiometabolic disease. Many international guidelines prescribe exercise to maintain health (for example 30 min of moderate exercise 5 times a week), but such regimes still leave many people with prolonged sedentary time or inactivity, which has already been highlighted in previous research as harmful to health. Previous research has also shown more frequent breaks in sedentary time are beneficial for waist circumference, blood glucose control and other metabolic parameters.

Exercise 'snacking', whether before meals or not, provides breaks in sedentary time, and thus may be important for public health. In this study, 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise (CONT) did not improve blood sugar control, whereas distributing the same volume of exercise as three brief pre-meal HIT 'exercise snacks' resulted in a mean 12% reduction in the average post-meal glucose level (the mean across the three meals), an effect that was also sustained across the subsequent day. In this study ES lowered 24-h glucose levels relative to the control day, whereas CONT did not. Although compared to the control day ES was more effective than CONT on the day after exercise (subsequent 24 h), on that day the 24-h mean glucose for ES was not statistically significantly lower than CONT.

"The notion of doing small amounts of interval exercise before meals is a unique and very important feature of this study," says Francois. "Sustained hyperglycaemia following meals is an important feature of insulin resistance. Reducing these post-meal spikes is important for reducing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and its associated complications."

She adds: "Dosing these small amounts of high intensity exercise before meals (particularly breakfast and dinner) may be a more time efficient way to get exercise into people's day, rather than devoting a large chunk of the day."

She concludes: "We found exercise snacking to be a novel and effective approach to improve blood sugar control in individuals with insulin resistance. Brief, intense interval exercise bouts undertaken immediately before breakfast, lunch and dinner had a greater impact on post-meal and subsequent 24 h glucose concentrations than did a single bout of moderate, continuous exercise undertaken before an evening meal. The practical implications of our findings are that, for individuals who are insulin resistant and who experience marked post-meal increases in blood glucose, both the timing and the intensity of exercise should be considered for optimising glucose control."

The researchers are continuing the work in this area, and are set to publish further studies, including one other acute 24 hour response to high-intensity exercise using different forms of exercise in younger sedentary individuals, and a longer-term training study on other health-related measures. They also plan to study such exercise targeting younger insulin-resistant individuals.

Provided by Diabetologia


 

Gone in 60 Seconds: One Minute of Activity to Avoid Storing Calories of a Meal as Body Fat.

December 21, 2010

What if a brief exercise of 60-90 seconds, made it less likely that dessert would get stored as body fat? That is exactly one of the things Tim Ferriss explores in The 4-Hour Body].

Brief Muscular Contractions a Few Minutes Before You Eat?

So most of you probably know that after an intense workout, food calories are less likely to get stored as body fat. A simplistic explanation is that your muscles are depleted of glycogen and that a lot of the calories you eat at this time simply serve to refuel these depleted muscles. What I did not know was how little the stimulus needs to be in order for this to happen. Tim has found that this effect can happen in as little as 60-90 seconds. The proper activity done a few minutes before eating can encourage food calories to get shuttled into the muscle cells, before it has a chance to get stored as body fat.

Encouraging Insulin to Store Food Energy Into Muscle Cells

What exercise does is increase a substance in your body called GLUT-4 (glucose transporter type 4). Tim explains that exercise will encourage insulin to store calories in the muscle cells:

“The more muscular gates we have open before insulin triggers the same GLUT-4 on the surface of fat cells, the more we can put calories in muscle instead of fat”.

In The 4-Hour Body, Tim talks about a study which compares the effect of 280 seconds of intense exercise to a 6 hour low intensity exercise session. What the study found was that 280 seconds of intense exercise increased Glut-4 in the muscle by 83%…and 6 hours of lower intensity exercise increased it by 91%. So 280 seconds of exercise had almost the same effect as 6 hours when it comes to increasing GLUT-4 levels.

From 280 Seconds…It now is truly effective Down to 60-90 Seconds

Short bouts of intermittent exercise throughout the day may be better than one vigorous workout in convincing your brain that you are full, according to a new study published in the journal Obesity.

The researchers didn’t note any difference in PYY levels when comparing the two forms of exercise.

But on the day the participants did shorter bursts of exercise more regularly, they reported feeling up to 32% fuller between 1pm and 3pm. They also felt fuller between 3pm and 5pm.

Study co-author Tim Fairchild, from Murdoch University’s School of Psychology and Exercise, said a regime of shorter exercise sessions presented a promising alternative for weight maintenance and weight loss.
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Even Short Bursts Of Intense Exercise Can Improve Metabolism

Wednesday 28 January 2009 - 12am PST


 Sedentary people who find the idea of fitting regular exercise sessions into their lives so difficult that they don't even try, may be interested to hear about a new study that found even regular short bursts of intense exercise, showed a significant effect on the body's ability to metabolize sugars and could be an effective way to cut the risk of diabetes.


This was the conclusion of a study by professor James Timmons and a team of researchers from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland, that is to be published in the journal BMC Endocrine Disorders.

Most people know that regular physical activity is a good way to cut the risk of developing heart disease and Type 2 diabetes, but knowing it and doing it are not the same, and many people feel they just don't have the time to do vigorous aerobic exercise for several hours week, as suggested by many of the current guidelines.

Timmons said that while these guidelines are worthwhile in principle, the fact many people don't follow them shows we need an alternative.

"Unfortunately, many people feel they simply don't have the time to follow current exercise guidelines. What we have found is that doing a few intense muscle exercises, each lasting only about 30 seconds, dramatically improves your metabolism in just two weeks," he said.

Timmons and colleagues investigated the effect of "high-intensity interval training" (HIT) on the metabolic performance of sixteen sedentary male volunteers aged from 19 to 23 years with an average BMI (body mass index) of 23.7.

This type of exercise has been shown to improve aerobic function, but its effect on insulin action and glycemic control has not been investigated, wrote the authors in their background information.

The researchers measured the volunteers' aerobic and metabolic performance before and after the training.

The results showed that:

  • After two weeks of HIT, many measures of metabolic performance improved.

 

  • For instance, the area under the blood glucose, insulin and non-esterified fatty acid or NEFA curves reduced by 12, 37 and 26 per cent respectively (all p<0.001).

 

  • Insulin sensitivity, as measured by the Cederholm index, improved by 23 per cent.

 

  • And, although the fasting blood insulin and glucose levels did not change, there was a tendency for fasting blood NEFA to go down after training.


"The efficacy of a high intensity exercise protocol, involving only ~250 kcal of work each week, to substantially improve insulin action in young sedentary subjects is remarkable."

" This novel time-efficient training paradigm can be used as a strategy to reduce metabolic risk factors in young and middle aged sedentary populations who otherwise would not adhere to time consuming traditional aerobic exercise regimes," they added.

The researchers said highly vigorous activity on a few days per week should have a similar protective effect on metabolism. As Timmons explained:

"This novel approach may help people to lead a healthier life, improve the future health of the population and save the health service millions of pounds simply by making it easier for people to find the time to exercise."

"Current guidelines, with regards to designing exercise regimes to yield the best health outcomes, may not be optimal and certainly require further discussion. The low volume, high intensity training utilized in our study substantially improved both insulin action and glucose clearance in otherwise sedentary young males and this indicates that we do not yet fully appreciate the traditional connection between exercise and diabetes," he added.
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"Extremely short duration high intensity training substantially improves insulin action in young healthy males."
John A Babraj, Niels BJ Vollaard, Cameron Keast, Fergus M Guppy, Greg Cottrell and James A Timmons.
BMC Endocrine Disorders (in press).

 

How to Do Short Burst Exercising

 -Spending 2 minutes 30 seconds exercising at a high level of intensity, could be better at protecting the body against risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) than longer sessions of less intense exercise, claimed experts at the British Science Festival.

 The ability of the body to deal with fat following a high-fat meal is a marker for the likelihood that a person will develop CVD in the future. The faster the body is able to get rid of the fat in the blood following a high-fat meal, the less at risk that person is of developing CVD - for example atherosclerosis, which is the build up of fat within the blood vessels. The findings of our study showed that high-intensity shorter intervals of exercise might be a more effective method to improve health and reduce the time commitment to exercise. "This is highly important as time is often cited as the main barrier to taking part in exercise. 

 "We are now investigating how long the benefits of a short high-intensity exercise session last on the body to analyse how frequently a person should exercise at this level to help protect the body against CVD. Our initial findings suggest that this type of exercise session would need to be undertaken on most days of the week to maintain the associated health benefits for the body."

 Findings of the study—published in Clinical Science—showed the fat content in the blood of participants after that meal was reduced by 33% compared to if they had not undertaken any exercise. 

 

-The metabolic window

 It is one of those phenomena of which bodybuilders and athletes have been instinctively aware since well before the dawn of the modern lycra-clad fitness industry. The metabolic window is that special period of time immediately following a workout when our bodies are particularly sensitive to the nutrients we ingest.

It is believed the muscles are particularly receptive during this time to certain hormones that promote the absorption of protein and carbohydrates.

The window is traditionally believed to open about 15 minutes after cessation of exercise

Eating the right foods at the right time is like making a smart financial investment and cashing it in at precisely the optimum moment.

 
-"30-second secret to lifelong health" 

THIRTY-SECOND bursts of intense activity may be better at warding off heart disease and related conditions than hours spent pounding the pavements or at the gym, according to a new exercise regime to be unveiled this week. The findings have particular importance in Scotland, which still has a stubbornly poor diet-and-exercise related, high rate of heart conditions.

“The exercises reduce all the things we know that cause cardiovascular disease,” added Timmons. “This approach may help people lead a healthier life, improve the future health of the population, and save the health services millions of pounds simply by making it easier for people to find time to exercise.”

 

-Vigorous Exercise Suppresses Appetite

The President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports states that vigorous exercise suppresses your appetite hormones following a workout.

 Sticking to strict number of calories per day can be difficult, but exercise can make it easier. Based on this research, I would recommend exercising just before you eat a meal or snack; the appetite suppressing effects of the exercise will help you eat fewer calories.

 

Have a Minute? Then You Have Time for a Workout

By Carl Engelking | November 6, 2014 3:04 pm

In May, the New York Times published a story about the scientifically proven 7-minute workout routine to stay fit. But who has seven minutes? Now, scientists have discovered that just one minute of all-out, high-intensity exercise three times a week can markedly improve muscle and heart health in overweight individuals.

180 Seconds Per Week

Researchers from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada recruited 14 men and women who were overweight, but in good health, to test the expedited fitness regimen. All the participants regularly exercised two or fewer times per week, and were far from reaching the recommended 150 minutes of weekly moderate exercise.

Researchers recorded participants’ baseline health information and took blood and muscle samples. Then, they put participants on a 6-week training regimen. During the training period, researchers individually customized each person’s diet using a mathematical formula to calculate their required calories — roughly 2,600 calories for men and 1,800 calories for women.

Seeing Results

It turns out that just 1 minute of intense exercise three times a week for 6 weeks was potent enough to induce physiological changes in the bodies of 14 overweight people, based on measurements following their workouts.

Blood pressure and blood glucose readings for both men and women improved. Their bodies’ maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) — one of the best measures of cardiovascular fitness — also increased by 12 percent. Researchers published their findings Monday in the online journal PLOS One.

Researchers write that their study “provides further evidence of the potential for very brief, intense bursts of exercise to elicit physiological adaptations that are associated with improved health status in a time-efficient manner.” In other words: busy people, your cover is blown.